Florida, like every state, has various rules and laws related to driving. These laws are meant to keep everyone on the road—drivers, passengers, bicyclists, and pedestrians—safe. Ideally, every Floridian with a driver’s license remembers their driver’s ed training and the laws they learned.

However, given the high number of accidents that occur every year on Florida’s roads, it is safe to say that isn’t the case. Some drivers might not know what every sign on the road means, while others might not be up to date on the latest laws in place to curtail distracted driving

Another area of driving law some drivers might not remember from their driver’s ed classes pertains to yielding the right of way. The right of way refers to which driver has the right to proceed when one or more vehicles are at an intersection or trying to enter a road at the same time and there is no signage to indicate who should go first.

In some cases, the right of way might also include when a car needs to yield to a pedestrian or a biker. The following are more examples of who has the right of way in various situations and why every driver should yield the right of way when appropriate. 

Understanding Florida’s Right of Way Laws

Questions regarding yielding the right of way are most common when it comes to four-way stop signs. In some cases, one or more vehicles might stop at the stop sign at the same time. If that is the case it is the vehicle on the right who has the right of way and the other vehicles must yield the right of way to that vehicle. 

Other common right of way scenarios include:

  • Crosswalks: Cars are required to yield the right of way to pedestrians who are trying to cross the street at a marked crosswalk.
  • T-Intersections: A car entering a roadway must yield to vehicles that are already on that road. This includes cars going from one road to another and cars going from a driveway or parking lot to a road.
  • Freeways: Traffic entering a freeway via an on-ramp must yield to vehicles that are already on the freeway. In most cases, a yield sign will clearly indicate that the incoming traffic must yield.

There are many other less common right of way scenarios it might be good to refresh yourself on. There are many resources available and spending the time to make sure you understand who has the right of way on the road can go a long way to keeping everyone safe.

Why You Should Yield the Right of Way When Required By Law

There are several reasons why you should yield the right of way and follow all traffic laws whenever you are driving. First and most importantly is because it is the best way to keep everyone on the road safe.

A second reason you should yield the right of way when appropriate is because a failure to do so could lead to a citation for a moving violation. This in turn could eventually increase your insurance rates.

Finally, you should understand and follow right of way laws because a failure to do so could make you liable should a car accident occur. If you cause an accident because you failed to yield the right of way, the other driver could sue you for damages. This could lead to a significant headache if not financial ruin.

What To Do If You Are Injured in an Accident Because Another Driver Failed to Yield the Right of Way

If you are injured in an accident because another driver failed to yield the right of way when they should have, it is in your best interest to contact a qualified Florida car accident attorney as soon as possible. A good lawyer will be able to investigate your case, persuasively point out the other party’s fault, and help you maximize the damages you can recover.

When other drivers fail to follow the law on the road you should not be left to pay for your damages on your own. A skilled lawyer can help you get the justice and money you deserve.